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Does Your Clutter Have a Hidden Message?

Given that everything is energy and that clutter represents stuck energy, it makes complete sense that persistent pockets of clutter are physical manifestations of a deeper message. In fact, psychologists know that true hoarders have issues “…such as indecisiveness, perfectionism, procrastination, disorganization and distractibility.”

This suggests that every pocket of persistent clutter in your life could be about something deeper. I recall the time I finally sold all my college textbooks that were taking up valuable space in my tiny New York City apartment. I realized that I had been keeping them so that people would know that I was smart (the antidote for too many years of being taken for a dumb blonde). But I no longer needed to prove myself to anyone. So, I let go of the books.

What am I holding onto now that no longer makes sense? 

The kids’ massive collection of Legos, the dollhouse and the adorable Sylvanian families. These items represent their childhood, and I just can’t seem to let go of them. I tear up just thinking about it. Okay, I’m a sap. Of course, keeping the toys won’t bring back their childhood. So it is entirely irrational. (And I don’t want them to suddenly revert to toddlers, even if I could turn back time.)

I’m clear that my job as a parent is to help them grow up into self-sufficient, capable and confident adults. Just writing about this helps me see what the toys represent. But also they are the kids’ toys. They’re not mine to give away. 

I’m also holding onto quite a few glamorous accessories from my New York City life that I rarely use in my current casual seaside lifestyle. I am holding onto these remnants of a really fun time when I was single and went out dancing three times a week, attending balls and fancy fundraisers. A part of me pines for that life. However, I never wanted to raise children in the city. Going back to that lifestyle holds no appeal, even though I love visiting. Perhaps the message is that I need to get to London more often to satisfy the desire.

As you can see, our things may not be merely things. They may contain a hidden message or memories we want to keep or relive.

I recently read What Your Clutter is Trying to Tell You: Uncover the Message in the Mess and Reclaim Your Life by Kerri Richardson. Richardson says, “Overtly visible clutter is a loud and clear message that something needs your attention. By ignoring it, you send the message that you’re not a priority.” 

My most visible clutter is my perennially messy desk. As soon as I clear it, it gets covered again with papers and books. Richardson says that clutter in a home office could be “…suffocating your financial health.” Eternal clutter in an office may “…act as a form of self-sabotage in your career” or blocks about money. Paradoxically, my desk is currently cluttered with books about money! I’ve been researching for the book I’m writing about money and financial freedom. And guess what? I’ve been working on this book for over seven years now! I would say some blocks are lurking about. 

The nifty thing is that even if you can’t figure out what the block is, the act of cleaning the clutter can release the block. The physical can help shift the emotional and vice versa. On that note, I’m now going to clear my desk!

What are your persistent or visible pockets of clutter? 

Here are a few helpful resources mentioned in Kerri Richardson’s book, What Your Clutter is Trying to Tell You: Uncover the Message in the Mess and Reclaim Your Life.

  • Email Clutter

Unsubscribe from email lists at once via Unroll.me. When you sign up for a free account, you can see a list of everything to which you’re subscribed. And you can quickly unsubscribe at once.

  • Kid’s Artwork

Artkiveapp.com provides a prepaid shipping label so you can send artwork to be scanned into your private account. You can then order a hardcover book of prints or choose images to be printed on a beach towel, tablet cover, shower curtain or puzzle. How cool is that?!

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